17.08.2006

Module 2: Form, Meaning and Function EKIS200

Advanced Studies

EKIS201 GRAMMAR IN DISCOURSE 5 pts
Arja Piirainen-Marsh

Prerequisites:  Exploring grammar 1, Exploring grammar 2 (or Form, meaning and function in language)

Target group:  Advanced students. The course is suitable for both future teachers and other English specialists.

Aim and content: This course is intended for students who are already familiar with structures of English and basic grammatical tools for describing it.  The course will deepen your understanding of grammar through examining how linguistic forms and structures are used to express meanings in discourse. The starting point for grammatical analysis is a view of language as discourse, in other meaningful social activity that is shaped by the context in which it occurs. We will analyse and describe the use of English in different discourse types, ranging from literary, academic and media texts to spoken interaction. Tools for analysis are drawn from functional grammar, discourse-functional linguistics and interactional linguistics. A central goal is to learn more about the concepts and methods that are needed for analysing discourse phenomena in natural language use. We will work towards this goal through readings, hands-on analysis tasks and group discussions.  

Mode of study:  Data analysis tasks carried out individually and pairs, homework assignments.

Assessment:  Three written assignments. Regular attendance and participation in class discussion will be a prerequisite for passing the course.

Reading:  A. Downing and P. Locke (1995), A University Course in English Grammar, London: Routledge.  Additional readings will be provided during the course.


EKIS202 SOCIOLINGUISTICS 5 points
Elizabeth Peterson

Aim and content: This course offers an overview of some of the basic components of sociolinguistic studies, including multilingualism in its various forms, language planning, language death, geographical and social variation, language change, linguistic politeness, language and gender, pidgins and Creoles, ethnic dialects, and the role of language in education. Students will have the opportunity to delve into an area of sociolinguistic interest through a small research project, conducted individually or in pairs.

Textbook/required reading: J. Mesthrie, J. Swann, A. Deumert & W.L. Leap (2002), Introducing sociolinguistics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press/other selected journal articles (announced in class).

Prerequisites: The Story of English (Variation and Change).

Mode of study: Lectures, readings, participation, in-class activities, homework, research.

Assessment: Participation, assignments, research project and report, midterm examination.


EKIS206 VARIETIES OF SPOKEN ENGLISH 5 points
Elizabeth Peterson

Target group: Students who are interested in learning more about non-standard varieties of English.

Aim and content: This course offers a survey of the basic features of English dialects, viewing them through a contrastive view of linguistic features at all linguistic levels. With an emphasis on spoken language, we will discuss the features of 1) World Englishes 2) Norm-providing varieties of English 3) regional, social, and ethnic varieties of English. Discussion involves the notion of “standard” and how attitudes toward language varieties relate to social and educational goals. Students will be expected to identify grammatical features of varieties of English, as well as to distinguish between various dialects through aural exercises.

Textbook/required reading: A course packet will be available at university bookstores

Prerequisites: The Story of English (Variation and Change).

Mode of study: Lectures, readings, participation, assignments, self-study, group work.

Assessment: Participation, assignments, in-class presentation of course reading/topic, examination (including aural recognition).    


EKIS207 INVESTIGATING REGIONAL VARIETIES OF ENGLISH 5 pts
Päivi Pahta

Prerequisites: Näkökulmia kieleen (formerly, Introduction to Language Study), Exploring Grammar 2.

Target group: Advanced level students.

Aim and content: This course provides an opportunity to explore the linguistic nature of regional varieties of English in detail on different levels of language. The course is useful for all language specialists, including prospective teachers, who in their future work will need some familiarity with a wide range of Englishes spoken around the world. We will operate on the notion of regional variation, investigating actual linguistic similarities and differences in form and usage between major varieties like British, American or Australian English, indiginized colonial varieties like Indian or African Englishes, or more recent additions to the English-language family like Chinese Englishes or Euro-English. More local varieties traditionally known as dialects also receive attention, as do various language contact phenomena contributing to the special characteristics of regional varieties.

Mode of study: Lectures, readings, discussions, group work, project work.

Assessment: Regular attendance, participation in group work, project paper.

Required reading: The following book serves as basic background reading: Melchers, Gunnel & Philip Swan (2003), World Englishes. Other readings will be provided during the course.


EKIS208 CORPUS-BASED APPROACHES TO LANGUAGE 5 pts
Päivi Pahta

Prerequisites: Näkökulmia kieleen (formerly, Introduction to Language Study), Exploring Grammar.

Target group: Advanced level students.

Aim and content: This course is an introduction to a rapidly expanding field known as corpus linguistics. No prior knowledge of the field is required, basic computer literacy will do. The course provides a step-by-step guide to the world of corpora, i.e. computer-readable text collections, which are a useful tool for all language specialists for a number of different purposes. The students will become acquainted with some of the major English-language corpora and corpus tools suitable for various approaches to language and a wide range of research and teaching purposes, including written- and spoken-language corpora, regional corpora, special-language corpora, genre-specific corpora, learner corpora, and comparable corpora. We will review the role that corpus linguistics, drawing on empirical analyses of large amounts of computerized real-language data, plays in our understanding of language and linguistic theory. The students will also learn how to create a corpus of their own e.g. for their pro gradu project, how to collect and computerize data for inclusion in a corpus, and how to conduct a corpus analysis of a completed corpus.

Mode of study: Lectures, readings, hands-on sessions, exercises, project work.

Assessment: Regular attendance, a small-scale research project.

Required reading: The following book is useful as a beginner's guide to the world of corpora: Meyer, Charles (2002) English Corpus Linguistics. Other readings will be provided during the course.


SELF-STUDY OPTIONS:

Examiner: Arja Piirainen-Marsh

Pragmatics (3-5 pts):
• Louise Cummings, 2005. Pragmatics. A multidisciplinary perspective. Edinburgh University Press. (2 pts)
• Penelope Brown & Stephen Levinson, 1987. Politeness. Some universals in language usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (3 pts)

Examiner: Elizabeth Peterson   

Sociolinguistics (3-5 pts):
• D. Boxer, 2002. Applying sociolinguistics: domains and face-to-face interaction. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (2 pts)
• J. Brutt-Griffler, 2002. World English: a study of its development. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. (2 pts)
• J. Mesthrie  J. Swann, A. Deumert & W.L. Leap, 2002. Introducing sociolinguistics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. (3 pts)



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