17.08.2006

Module 4: Text and Discourse EKIS400

Advanced Studies

EKIS401 LANGUAGE AND EMBODIMENT 5 pts
Arja Piirainen-Marsh

Target group: Advanced students. The course is suitable for both future teachers and other English specialists. Previous studies in the area of interaction studies (Johdatus keskusteluntutkimukseen or The Study of Talk and interaction) help to understand the topics covered on this course.


Aim and content:
This course offers a research-based introduction to the study of embodied practices in human interaction.  It focuses on the ways in which people make use of verbal, non-verbal and contextual resources in conducting interaction and participating in social activity. We will study how people coordinate speech, body movement and practical action when they communicate. A central goal is to learn to analyse how people make use of visual, spatial, gestural and material resources as well as language in organising social action. We will examine sequences of interaction drawn from video-recordings of authentic discourse and discuss how the participants organises their actions and what kinds of resources they use. Features such as gesture, posture, spatial configurations, intonation, voice quality, laughter etc. will be examined from the point of view of how they add to the verbal messages in the setting.


Mode of study:
Lectures, readings, class discussion and data analysis, individual or group projects. Students will be encouraged to work on their own project using the tools and methods learned on the course and to report on their findings in class.

Assessment: 
Three assignments, oral presentation or course paper based on individual or group projects.

Reading:
Course materials and selected texts to be provided during the course. A list of recommended reading will be provided.


EKIS402 INVESTIGATING NEW MEDIA TEXTS   5 pts
Sirpa Leppänen

Prerequisites: ’ Näkökulmia kieleen’ ja ’Näkökulmia soveltavaan kielentutkimukseen’. (Also ‘Johdatus tekstintutkimukseen’ course also gives useful background information for this course.)

Target group: Advanced level students.

Aim and content:
For many language experts, new communication and information media - e.g. the web, e-mail, IRC, chat, mobile phones -  are an important part of their professional life.  In their work they have to make use new media for example  in the task of  designing the content, language, architecture and outlook of websites, of  writing technical documents, and web texts of different genres, and in communicating with their clients and colleagues.  New media are no less significant in our everyday lives which are increasingly saturated by media uses of various kinds - text messaging, electronic games,  IRC, chat,  weblogs, fan fiction, for example.  The ability to use new media effectively are essential skills in modern life. Bearing in mind the skills and challenges new media pose to language experts, in particular, and building on recent research on new media, this course introduces to students some key aspects of  new media texts and their contexts of production and reception, and  familiarises them with methods for analysing and evaluating them as linguistic, textual and semiotic entities.

Mode of study:
Lectures, readings, exercises, assignments.

Assessment: A small scale research project.


EKIS451 SHAKESPEARE (comedies) 5 pts
Michael Freeman

Target group: All students at this level of their studies.

Aim and Content: study of two comedies, viz. A Midsummer Night's Dream and Twelfth Night (autumn term only).

Mode of study: Discussion-based exposition proceeding linearly through each play and illustrated by different productions on video. After the first, introductory, week, the course will run for five weeks each play. Weekly group meetings; one term or two terms.

Assessment: one examination essay on each play.

Reading material: For optimum pleasure and enlightenment participants are advised to obtain annotated texts of the plays, such as the Arden, Penguin, Oxford, or Cambridge editions, as there will be much in the language that is new and some of it will be difficult.


EKIS455 SHAKESPEARE (tragedies) 5 pts
Michael Freeman

Target group: All students at this level of their studies

Aim and Content: study of two tragedies, viz. Othello and Romeo & Juliet (spring term only)

Mode of study: Discussion-based exposition proceeding linearly through each play and illustrated by different productions on video. The course will run for five weeks each play. Weekly group meetings; one term or two terms.

Assessment: one examination essay on each play.

Reading material: For optimum pleasure and enlightenment participants are advised to obtain annotated texts of the plays, such as the Arden, Penguin, Oxford, or Cambridge editions, as there will be much in the language that is new and some of it will be difficult.

 
EKIS453 LITERARY TEXTS – Advanced 5 pts
Roger Noël Smith

Target group: The minimum attendance requirement is to have passed both Introduction to Critical Analysis and at least one of Michael Freeman's Literary Text courses at Subject Studies, as this course builds on topics previously covered in those courses. Ideally, students will also have attended American Novels, though that is not a requirement.

Aim and content: Through examination of formal qualities we will consider meaning and how it is generated in texts that are representative of different literary periods from the early seventeenth century to modern times.

Mode of study: Every week a different prose passage or poem will be prepared in advance by students and in the classes responses will be compared and discussed.

Required Reading: The weekly texts for study will be provided. Because of the previously stated requirements of the target group for this course, students are expected to have copies of Ways of Reading and The Art of Fiction as useful reference books.

Assessment: One written assignment of 1000-1200 words. Quality of participation in class will also be taken into account.


SELF-STUDY OPTIONS:

Examiner: Arja Piirainen-Marsh

The study of interaction (2-5 pts):
Selected papers in discourse and conversation analysis: 3 – 5 selected articles published by researchers in this field. This option is intended for those who are interested in the study of talk from the point of language use, structures of interaction and/or gesture and embodiment. Please contact the examiner to plan your own reading package.   

Discourse analysis (3-5 pts):
• Jan Blommaert, 2005. Discourse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (2 pts)
• Deborah Schiffrin, 1994. Approaches to discourse. Blacwell. (3 pts)
• M. McCarthy & R. Carter, 1994. Language as discourse. Perspectives for language teaching. Longman. (2 pts)
• Ron Scollon & Suzie Wong Scollon, 2003. Discourses in place. London: Routledge.
(2 pts)
• Ron Scollon & Suzie Wong Scollon, 2004. Nexus analysis. London: Routledge. (2 pts)


Examiner: Sirpa Leppänen

(3-5 pts to be taken at one time; choose from any of the books below)

Genre Analysis:
• Vijay Bhatia, 2004. Worlds of Written Discourse: A genre-based view. London. Longman. (3 pts)

Critical discourse analysis:
• Norman Fairclough, 1992. Discourse and social change. Cambridge: Polity Press.
• Norman Fairclough, 2003. Analyzing Discourse: Textual Analysis for Social Research. London: Routledge. (2 pts)
• Clare Walsh, 2001. Gender and Discourse: Language and Power in Politics, the Church and Organisations. London: Longman. (3 pts)

Discourse analysis of fictional texts: 
• Joanne Thornborrow & Shan Wareing, 1998. Patterns in Language. London: Routledge. (2 pts)

Translation Studies:
• Lawrence Venuti, 1998. Scandals of translation: Towards an ethics of translation. London: Routledge. (3 pts)
• Peter Fawcett, 1997. Translation and Language: Linguistic Approaches Explained. Manchester: St. Jerome’s Press. (2 pts)
• Luise von Flotow, 1997. Translation and Gender: Translating in the 'Era of Feminism'. Manchester: St. Jerome’s Press. (3 pts)
• Douglas Robinson, 1997. Translation and Empire: Postcolonial Theories Explained. Manchester: St Jerome’s Press. (3 pts)


Examiner: Anne Pitkänen-Huhta


Literacy (3-5 pts):
• B. Cope & M. Kalantzis (eds.), 2000. Multilitarcies: literacy learning and the design of social futures. London: Routledge. (3 pts)
• R. Ivanič, 1998. Writing and identity. The discoursal construction of identity in academic writing. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. (2 pts)
• T.M. Lillis, 2001. Student writing. Access, regulation, desire. London: Routledge. (1 pt)
• D. Barton & M. Hamilton, 1998. Local literacies: reading and writing in one community. London: Routledge. (2 pts)
• D. Barton. Hamilton & R. Ivanic (eds), 2000. Situated literacies. Reading and writing in context. London: Routledge. (2 pts)
• G. Kress, 2003. Literacy in the new media age. London: Routledge. (3 pts)
• I. Snyder (ed.), 2002. Silicon literacies. Communication, innovation and education in the electronic age. London: Routledge. (2 pts)


Examiner: Roger Noël Smith

Fiction: American Novels (1-5 pts):
Option A (2 pts) is for students who have attended the American Novels course and who now wish to extend their reading and study of either Mark Twain or F. Scott Fitzgerald, by selecting two further novels by one of these authors.
Either 
• Mark Twain, A Connecticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court and Pudd'nhead Wilson
or
• F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Beautiful and Damned and Tender is the Night
Option B (1-3 pts):
Either
• Paul Auster, The Invention of Solitude (1 pt)
or 
•  Paul Auster, The Invention of Solitude and Leviathan (2 pts)
or 
•    Paul Auster, The Invention of Solitude, Leviathan, and The Book of Illusions (3 pts)
Students may do both Options A and B if they wish.

Examiner: Michael Freeman

Fiction: Fiction between the wars (2 pts):

Target group: All students
Content: study of three novels, viz. Evelyn Waugh, Decline and Fall; Graham Greene (1940), The Power and the Glory; Joyce Cary, The Horse’s Mouth.
Assessment: one examination essay comparing/contrasting the novels in specific respects. The novels may be brought into the exam and consulted when writing the essay.

Fiction: Two best-sellers from the 1980s (3 pts):

Target group: All students
Content: study of two novels, viz. Tom Wolfe, The Bonfire of the Vanities; Martin Amis, London Fields
Assessment: one examination essay comparing/contrasting the novels in specific respects. The novels may be brought into the exam and consulted when writing the essay.


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