17.08.2006

Module 4: Text and Discourse EKIA400

Subject Studies

EKIA401 LITERARY TEXTS - prose fiction 5 pts
Michael Freeman

Target group: All students (but note that some of the language is challenging)


Aim and content:  Introduction to the analysis and appreciation of prose fiction in English.  The course is structured around problem-solving tasks utilising short extracts from novels, short stories and plays.  The emphasis is on how meanings are generated by the interaction of text and reader, the use of common literary/rhetorical devices, and some of the main challenges to literary conventions that have taken place, in particular from illusionist realism to modernism.

Mode of study:  Participants prepare teacher-supplied texts and questions for discussion in class. Weekly group meetings, one term

Assessment: One written assignment. Class participation will also be taken into account.


EKIA402 LITERARY TEXTS - poetry 5 pts
Michael Freeman

Target group: All students (but note that some of the language is challenging)

Aim and content:  Introduction to the analysis and appreciation of poetry in English. The course is structured around problem-solving tasks focusing of poems or parts of poems. The course starts by looking at the question of what is poetic language with reference to Wordsworth at the close of the 18th century, and then moves on to consider the same question as treated by Ezra Pound and T S Eliot in the early 20th century.  Other ground-breaking poets, including Emily Dickinson and Sylvia Plath, will also be featured.

Mode of study: Participants prepare teacher-supplied texts and questions for discussion in class. Weekly group meetings, one term

Assessment: One written assignment. Class participation will also be taken into account.


EKIA403 AMERICAN NOVELS 5 pts
Roger Noël Smith

Aim and content: The study of three classic American novels, including examining the perennial American themes of identity, belonging and allegiance, and the methods the novelists employ to convey those themes.

Mode of study: Presentations by the course tutor; the reading of chapters and preparation of tasks prior to the seminars; and some pair and possibly group work.

Note: Students are required to have their own copy of each novel, and also of Lodge's The Art of Fiction. The novels will be studied in chronological order starting with Huckleberry Finn. Before each novel is started on the course, each student is required to have read that novel through at least once. Students intending to take this course will appreciate the need to have read the novels in order to take part properly in group discussion. As this course is being taken in the Spring semester, students who are planning to take this course are therefore being given four months' advanced notice of what the required reading is.

Required reading: Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth, F Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, David Lodge, The Art of Fiction.

Recommended reading:  Each of these books is in the Icon Critical Guide series, in which there are extracts from critical essays, in chronological order, with an accompanying narrative that summarises and comments on the developing critical arguments. These books are all very strongly recommended. They are usually obtainable relatively inexpensively at amazon.com.


EFIA404 INTRODUCTION TO THE ROMANTICS 5 pts

Aim and content:  Condemnation of the abuse of reason and the abuse of power, the inspired search for moral and ethical values, and for freedom, and the redefinition of the scope and style of literature itself, all characterise the 'Romantic' period in that burst of creative energy in the 50 years from 1770 to 1820. Such topics will be examined in writing by political and social reformers of the day, and by such celebrated figures as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Percy and Mary Shelley.

Mode of study: Work on tasks at home as preparation for the seminars; work on tasks at the meetings, reading and discussion, and presentations by the course tutor. Some use of TV programmes.

Assessment: Written assignment of 1000-1200 words.


SELF-STUDY OPTIONS:


Examiner: Sirpa Leppänen

(3-5 pts to be taken at one time; choose from any of the books below)

Discourse analysis:
• James Gee, 1999. An introduction to discourse analysis: theory and method. London: Routledge. (1 pt)
• Barbara Johnstone, 2002. Discourse analysis. Oxford: Blackwells. (2 pts)

Genre analysis:
• Vijay Bhatia, 1993. Analysing genre: language use in professional settings. Harlow: Longman. (2 pts)

Critical discourse analysis:
• Norman Fairclough, 1995. Media discourse. London: Arnold (2 pts)
• S. Mills, 1995. Feminist stylistics. London: Routledge. (2 pts)

Discourse analysis of fictional texts:
• Mary Talbot, 1995. Fictions at work. London: Longman. (2 pts)

Translation Studies:
• Susan Bassnett, 1990. Translation studies. London: Routledge. (1 pt)
• Basil Hatim & Ian Mason, 1990. Discourse and the translator. London: Longman. (2 pts)
• Basil Hatim & Ian Mason, 1997. The translator as a communicator. London: Routledge. (2 pts)
• Andrew Chesterman & Emma Wagner, 2002. Can theory help translators? A dialogue between the ivory tower and the wordface. Manchester: St. Jerome’s Press. (1 pt)
• Christian Nord, 1997. Translating as a purposeful activity: functionalist approaches explained. Manchester: St. Jerome Press. (2 pts)


Examiner: Anne Pitkänen-Huhta


Literacy (3 pts):
• D. Barton, 1994. Literacy: an introduction to the ecology of written language. Oxford: Blackwell.
• M. Baynham, 1995. Literacy practices: investigating literacy in social contexts. London: Longman.


KLSA102 JOHDATUS KESKUSTELUNTUTKIMUKSEEN
Arja Piirainen-Marsh ja jatko-opiskelijoita


Lisätiedot laitoksen yhteisistä kursseista (KLS----) Korpissa.


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