19.11.2014

Course descriptions

English syllabus 2012-2015: Course descriptions

BASIC STUDIES

EKIP101 PHONETICS AND PRONUNCIATION, 2 pts

Learning outcomes: The course introduces students to the sound systems of languages, and to the principles used in the characterization of speech sounds. It also addresses pronunciation problems arising from phonetic and phonological contrasts between Finnish and English. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to

  • use the appropriate phonetic terminology and systems of transcription to describe the English sounds
  • analyze and assess the articulatory features of the English sound system
  • name and describe the main areas of difficulty in pronunciation for Finnish speakers of English
  • apply the appropriate mechanical articulation required in the target sounds
  • pronounce most target sounds accurately.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Lectures on phonetics and practice sessions on pronunciation. The practice sessions will mostly consist of drills where the aim is first to achieve the target sound in isolation and then to gradually extend this ability into more complex phonetic environments.
Assessment: The grade for the course will result from the phonetics examination (theory and transcription, grading on the scale from 0 to 5). However, students must also pass a separate pronunciation examination (reading and recording a passage of text) in order to complete the course.
Reading: Peacock, M. English Pronunciation (purchasable from Kirjavitriini in the University Library; each student is required to have a copy and to bring it to every class).
Target group: First year students.

 

EKIP102 ACADEMIC WRITING, 4 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • recognise basic features of academic texts and produce short, basic texts according to academic conventions
  • see writing as a process and recognise the phases of the process
  • set goals for their work in academic writing
  • plan time management for their work and take responsibility for their work
  • give peer feedback on academic texts
  • better understand their own skills and ways of learning and themselves as writers, and evaluate their skills
  • produce a portfolio for feedback and evaluation
  • see the relevance of these skills in working life.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Weekly class meetings for one semester: class, group and pair work in addition to individual assignments.
Assessment: Class attendance (required), peer feedback, written assignments and a portfolio, in which students assess their work and learning in relation to their goals. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Course booklet Academic Writing Handbook 2013-14: How to Survive in Academic Writing; available at Kirjavitriini. Please buy the book and bring it to the first class meeting.
Target group: All students starting their English studies.

 

EKIP103 PRACTICAL GRAMMAR, 2 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • use English more accurately in speech and writing
  • identify typical problems for Finnish speakers of English and (hopefully) avoid them.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Presentation and practice. As the name says, this is a very practical course. The groups meet for 2 hours a week over 2 periods / 1 semester or for 4 hours a week in one period.
Assessment: Grading on the scale from 0 to 5, based on course work (40%) and final exam (60%).
Reading: Course materials provided by the teacher.
Target group: First year students.

 

EKIP203 INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE STUDY, 3 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • view language as a research subject
  • recognise the variety of languages in the world and the linguistic variety within one language
  • identify various research areas (e.g. general and applied linguistics) and research orientations (e.g. language and society) in linguistics
  • recognise the central levels of linguistic description (phonology, morphology, syntax, lexis, semantics, pragmatics) and the basic terminology related to them
  • recognise the research and teaching profiles in the Department of Languages: language learning and teaching, language use and discourse, language and culture
  • apply basic linguistic terms and analysis into English and describe the basics of English as a system
  • find information in research literature and linguistics web pages
  • understand how knowledge of linguistics is related to building their own profiles of language expertise.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Tutorials (attendance required): class, group and pair work; assignments and study of the course material.
Assessment: Continuous assessment and two home exams. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Course booklet (available at Kirjavitriini). Course book: Yule, G. (2010). The Study of Language (4th edition). Cambridge: CUP.
Target group: All students of English.

 

EKIP204 EXPLORING GRAMMAR 1, 2 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • describe the structure of language using basic grammatical terminology
  • distinguish the English basic clause types from each other
  • analyse written language clauses and sentences with the help of the categories presented in the course
  • name and distinguish from each other the different phrases and their parts, and
  • understand the connections between the different levels of structural analysis.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Lectures based on course material, participation in classroom work and discussion, analysing language structure in various texts individually and in groups.
Assessment: Participation in classroom work and two home exams. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Exploring Grammar 1 -booklet, available at Kirjavitriini.
Target group: First year students.

 

 

EKIP403 INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES, 3 pts

Learning outcomes: Students usually come to the department without having studied literature very much previously. After completing the course students are expected to be able to

  • identify and describe specified tools used in literary analysis
  • apply specified analytical tools to given literary texts
  • identify and describe broad categories of genres, forms and techniques
  • provide appropriate evidence for textual comment
  • write a critical analysis of a literary text applying specified analytical tools.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Text-based, topic-based and task-based work. The course will be posted in Optima where the topics, texts and tasks will be available. Before each meeting, there will be a literary text to read and an accompanying task. Students will be given the opportunity to compare individual responses within a small group; there will be whole group feedback, and some presentation on the topic by the tutor.
Assessment: Examination graded on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Montgomery et al. (2007). Ways of Reading (3rd edition); Lodge, The Art of Fiction.
Target group: First year students.

 

EKIP404 DISCOURSE AND LITERACY, 2 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • identify the basic concepts and tools applied in literacy and discourse studies
  • read critically and recognise and analyse the various ways of making and mediating meanings through multimodal texts as well as talk
  • analyse the meanings conveyed by texts and talk produced in different contexts and the effect they have on their target audience and society in general.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study:
Lectures, analysing texts in groups.
Assessment: Regular attendance, course paper. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Course booklet Pitkänen-Huhta, A. & Varis, P. Discourse and Literacy (available at Kirjavitriini).
Target group: All students starting their English studies.

 

EKIP503 THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING WORLD TODAY, 3 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • appreciate some of the variety of countries and conditions within which English is spoken
  • better understand the cultures of two to four English-speaking countries
  • discuss these cultures in reasonably fluent and accurate English
  • read more critically, being aware of some of the factors that affect the dependability of a text.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Tutorial (two hours per week throughout the term) involving group and whole class discussions. Each teacher will teach the tutorial in his / her own way.
Assessment: 75% of the final mark will be based on the quality of contributions made to the class discussions. In order to participate in these discussions students will have to have read the relevant texts beforehand. The other 25% of the final mark will be given for a review, written at the end of the course, of the reading materials used during the year. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading:
Roger Noël Smith’s Groups:
First Semester - 1st Period of the course: Achebe, C. Things Fall Apart. 2nd Period: Contemporary Britain through the media: Students prepare topics for presentation and discussion that they choose from the British media.
Second Semester of the course: 1st Period: Bryson, B, The Lost Continent (about the United States).  2nd Period: Contemporary America through the media. Students prepare topics for presentation and discussion that they choose from the media in the US. 
Joe McVeigh's Groups:
First period of the course: Crystal, D. By Hook or By Crook (also titled Walking English) and McCarthy, P. McCarthy's Bar.
Second period: Bryson, B. I'm a Stranger Here Myself. Further reading material will be announced later.
In each period, students will be encouraged to present a comparison of the cultural accounts given in these popular books with current events in the places they describe and alternative definitions of culture in these places. We will focus on the UK and Ireland in the first period. In the second period we will look at North America and South Asia.
Target group: First year students.

 

EKIP505 HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH-SPEAKING WORLD, 3 pts

Learning outcomes: Students will

  • achieve a critical understanding of the major political stages in the expansion of British influence around the world
  • find out about the moves to independence and post-independence development in some of the larger countries affected
  • critically examine the evolution of Britain from colonial empire to often unenthusiastic member of the European Union
  • develop their reading skills in English
  • develop their ability to study independently.

Prerequisites: None. 
Method of study: Mostly independent study, but with introductory lectures in the first part of the first semester.
Assessment: Written examination (no books), with essay questions based on the required reading. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Henderson, Simon (2009). Aspects of American history. London: Routledge, and certain chapters of Morgan, Kenneth O. (Ed.) (2010, revised edition). The Oxford history of Britain. Oxford: OUP.
Target group: First year students.

 

EKIP504 THE STORY OF ENGLISH, 2 pts

Learning outcomes: The course introduces students to the use and users of the English language, and to its development from a regionally spoken language to a world language. After completing the course students will be able to

  • describe the changes that have occurred in English through centuries (in its pronunciation, orthography, grammar, and vocabulary), from the Old English period to the present day
  • describe the regional and social variation in Present-day English
  • explain the developments of the English language from the viewpoint of both language history and sociolinguistics
  • understand the political, economic, technological, and cultural reasons for the spread of English.

Prerequisites: EKIP203 Introduction to Language Study.
Methods of study: Background reading and exercises, the Internet, pair and group work, lectures.
Assessment: Completing tasks and readings, active participation in class and in small groups, end-of-term exam. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Reading materials in Optima.
Target group: First year students.

 

SUBJECT STUDIES


 

EKIA106 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION: ACADEMIC WRITING STEP 2, 3 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • use the skills they have chosen to develop for further academic writing, which may include some or all of the following

    • locating information in databases

    • using citations

    • style of academic writing

    • planning a pilot study for the BA Thesis

  • use the skills learnt in Academic Writing more efficiently for planning the work needed for the BA Thesis.

You will first identify the problem areas you want to be working on and the contents will be built around the needs identified. Either you have an on-going writing project for which you need support or you will create one for the course. It will also be possible to collaborate in a writing project. During the course it is possible to explore ideas and do a pilot study for the BA Thesis even a year before taking the BA Thesis Seminar.
Prerequisites: EKIP102 Academic Writing course or equivalent.
Methods of study: Work in pairs or small groups; peer feedback; oral presentation; individual or collaborative course paper and a learning journal or portfolio.
Assessment: Tutorials (regular attendance), course portfolio or learning journal; oral presentation (not graded). Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: Subject Studies students, possibly working on other written assignments at the moment.

 

EKIA106 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION: RESEARCH WRITING, 3 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • find and overview researched-based information on a topic

  • read source texts efficiently, in order to actively learn about and develop an informed viewpoint on a topic

  • incorporate source texts effectively into their own writing

  • write clear and convincing analytical prose

  • use appropriate register and tone for formal research reporting

  • use computer tools for improving the lexical and grammatical accuracy of texts.

Prerequisites: EKIP102 Academic Writing.
Methods of study: Lectures, in-class reading, writing and discussion tasks.
Assessment: Based on several small writing assignments leading up to a final paper. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Students will select several sources on a topic of their choice (which they will write about during the course). Other reading material will be provided by the instructor during the course.
Target group: Students who wish to develop their research writing skills, e.g. for writing a BA or MA Thesis.

 

EKIA106 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION, 3 pts

Learning Outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • identify the main criteria for writing effectively in the types of writing covered

  • apply those criteria in their own writing.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study:

  • the study of a variety of sample texts from among the following different types of writing : the English essay (i.e. personal writing on virtually any topic) , creative writing, literary criticism, opinion and argument, reporting, instruction

  • the writing of similar types of texts

  • critical discussion of the writing produced by students

  • redrafting and further discussion leading to a final draft.

Assessment: By outcome from the process described above and particularly the final drafts. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: The examples of texts of the different types are posted in Optima.
Target group: Anyone wanting to develop in a variety of types of writing.

 

EKIA157 ORAL COMMUNICATION, 2 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • take part in group discussions, present and argue their own ideas on a variety of topics

  • give a short presentation based on individual study on a given topic.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Group discussions and short presentations by students.
Assessment: Continuous assessment based on regular attendance and class participation. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: All students wishing to improve their oral communication skills in a variety of situations, with the emphasis on the presentation of ideas and arguments in group communication.

  

EKIA152 ORAL COMMUNICATION (TEACHERS), 2 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • present in an accessible and engaging way

  • promote class interaction and participation

  • give clear instructions

  • give constructive feedback

  • manage a class effectively

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Lectures, group work, practice sessions.
Assessment: Based on class participation and practice sessions for each skill covered by the course. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Reading material will be provided during the course.
Target group: Future teachers.

 

EKIA207 GRAMMAR IN USE, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • use English with a high degree of accuracy in both speech and writing

  • use a wider range of structures than before, and therefore express themselves more accurately and subtly.

Prerequisites: EKIP103 Practical Grammar and EKIP204 Exploring Grammar 1.
Methods of study: This is a follow-up course to Practical Grammar, and will be taught on the same principles of student participation and practice both orally and in written activities.
Assessment: Grading on the scale from 0 to 5, based on course work and homework assignments (40%) and final exam (60%).
Reading: Photocopies in the class, internet grammar sites.
Target group: Second or third year students who want to improve their grammatical accuracy in both spoken and written English.

 

EKIA211 VARIATION AND CHANGE IN ENGLISH, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course the student will be able to

  • identify and describe aspects of social, regional and stylistic variation in English

  • discuss the tendencies involved with different kinds of change (pronunciation, grammar, lexicon) that may take place in a language over time

  • apply empirical methods of studying the phenomena of variation and change.

Prerequisites: None.
Method of study: Weekly tutorials based on reading assignments.
Reading: Texts and questions provided each week.
Assessment: Class participation, homework assignments, and end-of-term test. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: Second or third year students.

 

EKIA303 WHAT IS A WORD, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: The main aim of this course is to raise students’ lexical awareness and explore the multitude of vocabulary studies. After completing the course students will be able to

  • discuss and explain different areas of vocabulary studies

  • explain how these different areas relate to each other and how they have developed

  • discuss and explain the English vocabulary as a system

  • apply this knowledge in enhancing their own vocabulary acquisition

  • apply their knowledge on English vocabulary in different roles of language experts such as editing and writing and assessing texts.

Prerequisites: Basic Studies.
Methods of study: Readings, pair/group work, writing and presenting a final report.
Assessment: Active participation in class and final report (presenting an experiment that applies what has been learnt in the course, and a written report). Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Material available in Optima.
Target group: Second or third year students.

 

EKIA201 EXPLORING GRAMMAR 2, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • understand the relationship between form and function in grammatical structures of English

  • analyse the relationship between linguistic form, meaning and function in different text types ranging from individual words and basic grammatical constructions to sentences, utterances and units of discourse, both in written and spoken discourse

  • use a set of tools and methods for analysis in other areas in language study (e.g. sociolinguistics, pragmatics, study of talk and discourse analysis) and in working life activities either in teaching or in other tasks of language experts.

The course aims to deepen your understanding of the basic grammatical structures of English after Exploring Grammar 1.
Prerequisites: EKIP203 Introduction to Language Study and EKIP204 Exploring Grammar 1.
Methods of study: Individual, pair work and group tasks in class, guided analysis tasks and written assignments.
Assessment: Regular attendance, three written assignments (individual and pair work). Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Exploring Grammar 2 -booklet and a separate Exercises and Activities -booklet, available at Kirjavitriini. Please make sure you have both booklets with you in the first class meeting. In addition to the booklet, the following grammar is strongly recommended as a backup and further reading: Downing, A. and Locke, P. (2006). English Grammar: A University Course (2nd Edition). London: Routledge.
Target group: Second and third year students (Subject Studies). Recommended for both future teachers of English and students with other professional interests.

 

EKIA209 LEARNING ABOUT LANGUAGE WITH CORPORA, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • consider language use as a context-dependent issue, and to critically approach prescriptive, rule-based notions of correct language

  • make use of electronic corpora or databases containing authentic language for a variety of purposes (checking grammar or word choice, regional variation, research)

  • see both the horizons and hazards of analysing electronic collections of language.

Prerequisites: Basic Studies.
Methods of study: Lectures, discussions on a selection of research articles, and a final report on a small-scale follow-up study on a chosen subject discussed during the course.
Assessment: Grading on the scale from 0 to 5, based active participation, homework assignments, and the final report.
Reading: A selection of texts, made available in Optima.
Target group: Second or third year students.

 

EKIA212 CONVERSATION AND INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: This course draws on pragmatics, sociolinguistics and intercultural communication to explore how meaning is constructed in interaction and how interactional norms vary across sociocultural communities. After completing the course students will be able to

  • analyse how social relationships are negotiated in language use

  • understand important concepts in pragmatics and politeness theory, and apply them to a range of social contexts

  • understand and effectively negotiate variation between communities’ conversational practices

Prerequisites: EKIP203 Introduction to Language Study.
Methods of study: Lectures, discussion, group work.
Assessment: Project work, course paper. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Useful background sources include Tannen, D. (1984). Conversational Style: Analyzing Talk among Friends; Scollon, R. & Scollon, S. (2001). Intercultural Communication; Spencer-Oatey, H. (ed.) (2000). Culturally Speaking. Compulsory reading material will be provided during the course.
Target group: Students who are interested in issues of interpersonal communication e.g. between cultures, genders, friends, colleagues, and so on.

 

EKIA301 LANGUAGE LEARNING AND TEACHING, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: This is an introductory course on Language Learning and Teaching targeted at future teachers of English and issues addressed within the Finnish school system where feasible. After completing the course students will be able to

  • name and explain most important issues and strands of research in the area of language learning and teaching

  • describe what knowing a language means

  • explain why some succeed in language learning while others do not

  • describe the developments in language learning and teaching over time

  • assess English text books from the point of view of syllabus design

  • describe language learning in different contexts

  • describe the different starting points of language assessment and apply standard rating scales in assessing different language skills.

Prerequisites: KLSP004 Johdatus kieleen ja sen tutkimukseen and KLSP005 Kohti kielenopettajuutta.
Methods of study: Weekly readings and tasks, pair and group work, lectures.
Assessment: Active participation in and out-of class, course paper, self-assessment. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Johnson, K. (2008). An Introduction to Foreign Language Learning and Teaching (2nd revised edition). Harlow: Pearson Education; and Language Learning and Teaching -booklet.
Target group: Compulsory course for teacher trainees, majors and minors; second or third year students.

 

EKIA302 RESEARCHING INTERACTION IN THE CLASSROOM, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be

  • able to differentiate between different theoretical and methodological approaches in the study of interaction, and of classroom interaction in particular

  • capable of utilizing discourse analysis, conversation analysis and ethnographic microanalysis to analyse classroom interaction

  • familiar with a number of studies which utilize each of these perspectives

  • comfortable making observations and reading transcripts of interactional data.

Prerequisites: Recommend previous experience working with interactional data, but not compulsory.
Methods of study: Lectures, readings and related discussion, group work with classroom data.
Assessment: Based on regular attendance and class participation, 3 written assignments on classroom data discussed in class. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: A reading list will be provided at the beginning of the course.
Target group: Subject or Advanced level students interested in researching interaction.

 

EKIA309 DESIGNING TEACHING MATERIALS, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: This course will explore factors that affect designing teaching materials. After completing the course students will be able to

  • discuss and explain how different language learning theories are reflected in teaching materials

  • discuss and explain how teaching philosophy can be taken into account in the design

  • explain and evaluate factors that have an effect on teaching materials

  • apply this knowledge to create some language teaching materials of their own and revise existing ones.

Prerequisites: EKIA301 Language learning and teaching.
Methods of study: Readings, lectures, pair/group work, designing one’s own material, final report.
Assessment: Active participation in class, material design and final report. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: A selection of texts, available through Optima.
Target group: Second or third year students.

 

EKIA310 TASKS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: This course will explore communicative, task-based language teaching. After completing the course students will be able to

  • understand the principles of communicative language teaching in general and task-based language teaching specifically

  • draw from a wide repertoire of different types of tasks when teaching

  • design language learning tasks as effective as possible (based on language learning theory and research)
  • design task-based courses in which tasks are combined and sequenced in ways that promote learners' progression
  • implement tasks in the classroom effectively.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Lectures, group work, practice sessions.
Assessment: Based on a practice teaching session and a task-portfolio. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: A useful background source is Willis D. & Willis J. (2007) Doing Task-based Teaching; Compulsory reading material will be provided during the course.
Target group: From second to fourth year students; future language teachers.

 

EKIA311 SUCCESS IN LEARNING EFL? 5 pts

Learning outcomes: This is a subject-level course for future teachers of English, and it focuses on learners and their contributions, or what might explain why some students succeed and others do not in learning foreign languages. After completing the course students will be able to

  • relate to the discussion of the characteristics of the Good Language Learner (which goes back to the mid-1970s) and its evolvement over the past few decades

  • list a host of individual learner differences, provide definitions and describe ways of measuring these (with some hands-on experience with tests available on the Internet) and explain their relationship to learning outcomes in learning foreign languages

  • plan and complete (in pairs or groups of three) a project on a topic related to the course: 1) conducting a small-scale empirical study; 2) writing a book review, 3) compiling a bibliography, or 4) designing a game; and produce a professional research report, book review, annotated bibliography or rules for a game.

Prerequisites: KLSA124 Johdatus kielen oppimisen ja opettamisen tutkimukseen and EKIA301 Language Learning and Teaching.
Methods of study: Readings and tasks, Internet, group and pair work, co-teaching, lectures, project work.
Assessment: Active participation in and out-of- class, project report, co-teaching, reflection and self-evaluation. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: A selected set of readings.
Target group: From second to fourth year students.

 

EKIA408 THE STUDY OF TALK AND INTERACTION, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: This course focuses on language as an interactional phenomenon and examines the forms it takes in a variety of real-life situations. It offers tools for examining how people co-ordinate turns and actions, organize social activities, adapt their use of language to particular contexts and construct and manage social relationships in the process of interaction. Data from a variety of social settings will be analysed and discussed to explore how participants communicate drawing on different verbal, embodied and contextual resources. After completing the course students will be able to

  • show an understanding of language as an interactional phenomenon

  • identify the most important structural features of interaction

  • collect, transcribe and analyse interactional data

  • apply the tools of conversation analysis to data of their own choice.

PrerequisitesEKI415 Working with Discourse.
Methods of study: Readings, group assignments, class discussion, field tasks, presentations.
Assessment: Presentations and written assignments based on readings and field tasks. Course paper based on individual or group project. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Selected readings will be provided.
Target group: Second and third year students.

 

EKIA409 LITERARY TEXTS – PROSE FICTION, 4 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • formulate and give evidence for their own critical opinions

  • discuss themes in a variety of passages of American, British and Irish prose fiction covering a variety of periods and genres (short stories, novels, plays)

  • analyse the methods employed by the writers to express their themes

  • identify some principal defining characteristics of various writers and periods.

Methods of study: Weekly guided tasks on typically two fairly short passages of prose fiction are prepared each week by the students for small group discussion prior to whole group discussion. This process of collaboration in discussion is a very valuable way of discovering, formulating, and refining our critical judgements (the method may be described therefore as ‘heuristic’, i.e. the learning takes place through discoveries that result from ideas that come from the student).
Assessment: Written assignment of approximately 1200 words. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: The texts are either posted in Optima or readily available on the Internet.
Target group: The course is designed as a bridge between Introduction to Literary Studies and literary courses at Subject and Advanced levels.

 

EKIA410 LITERARY TEXTS – POETRY, 4 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • formulate and give evidence for their own critical opinions

  • analyse ideas and effects in a variety of poems (mainly from the 20th century) and the methods employed by the poets to express them

  • identify some principal defining characteristics of various writers and periods.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Weekly guided tasks on typically a few poems, usually focusing on one poet though sometimes a selection of different poets on similar themes, are prepared each week by the students for small group discussion prior to whole group discussion. The poems chosen and the approach to them are designed to make the topic as accessible or 'user-friendly' as possible. The process of collaboration in discussion is a very valuable way of discovering, formulating, and refining our critical judgments (the method may be described therefore as ‘heuristic’, i.e. the learning takes place through discoveries that result from ideas that come from the student). There will be some supporting use of audio-visual materials e.g. radio, television or film programmes about poets and their work.
Assessment: Written assignment of approximately 1200 words. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: The texts are either posted in Optima or readily available on the Internet.
Target group: Anyone who values poetry or may have the seeds of interest in it and would like to explore it further. The course is designed as a bridge between Introduction to Literary Studies and literary courses at Subject and Advanced levels.

 

EKIA411 AMERICAN NOVELS, 4 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to discuss and write about

  • the presence of perennial American themes in the novels, such as identity, belonging and allegiance

  • methods employed by the novelists to convey those themes

  • the critique of American society in the novels.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Presentations by the course tutor; the reading in chronological order of chapters and preparation of tasks prior to the seminars; group work in class going over previously prepared questions, followed by whole group discussion. The weekly topics and tasks will be posted in Optima. Students intending to take this course will appreciate the need to have read the novels in order to take part properly in group discussion. There may be some use of the film.
Assessment: Examination. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Students are required to have their own copy of each novel: Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth, Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises, F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby; his short stories The Diamond as Big as The Ritz and The Ice Palace are posted in Optima and are highly recommended, and may also be studied in the course in relation to The Great Gatsby. Students should already have a copy of David Lodge, The Art of Fiction.
Target group: First and second year students mainly but others are welcome.

 

EKIA412 CLASSICS READING CIRCLE, 4 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • understand major trends and developments within British cultural and literary history

  • relate the themes and features of ‘classic’ British novels to their sociocultural and historical contexts

  • interpret and analyse the novels, applying a variety of approaches to literary criticism.

Prerequisites: EKIP403 Introduction to Literary Studies.
Methods of study: Reading, group discussion (students will work in groups of 4 or 5, i.e. their ‘reading circles’), lectures.
Assessment: Based on class participation and a written exam at the end of the course. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: In groups, students will select 4 classic novels from different eras in British literary history.
Target group: Students who enjoy reading and wish to gain greater familiarity with classic British prose and British cultural history.

 

EKIA415 WORKING WITH DISCOURSE, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • examine language as contexted, multimodal social activity

  • recognise and discuss key approaches to discourse

  • apply the basic concepts of discourse and conversation analysis to English text and talk.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Lectures, class discussion, hands-on analysis tasks, readings, home assignments.
Assessment: Active participation in class, 2-3 written assignments. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Course materials, selected articles.
Target group: Second and third year students.
 

EKIA463 LANGUAGE AND IDENTITY, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: Every time we use language, we identify ourselves in some way—both through what we say and how we say it. Moreover, the processes of language change, social change, and social identification are closely intertwined. After completing the course, students will be able to:

  • understand the social implications of the language/identity connection

  • understand various theoretical perspectives on the relationship between language and identity

  • discuss and debate issues within language and identity research

  • analyze how identities are constructed in interaction and in public discourse.

Prerequisites: None, although an introductory course on discourse analysis or sociolinguistics would be useful.
Methods of Study: Lectures, group work, analytical exercises.
Assessment: A series of short written assignments and workshops on a topic of the student’s choice. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Useful background sources include de Fina, A., Schiffrin, D., Bamberg, M. (Eds.) (2006). Discourse and Identity; Benwell, B. and Stokoe, E. (2006). Discourse and Identity. Compulsory reading material will be provided during the course.
Target Group: Students interested in issues of language and identity, and possibly planning to conduct research into language and identity.


EKIA465 THE LANGUAGE OF ADVERTISING, 5 pts 

Learning outcomes: After completing the course the students will be able to

  • identify different forms of offline and online advertisements,
  • understand and explain the communicative  functions of advertisements,
  • analyse advertising strategies from a linguistic perspective,
  • apply different tools for linguistic analysis,
  • understand and explain how language is used in persuasive messages.

Prerequisites: EKIP203 Introduction to Language Study 
Method of study: lectures, group discussion, home assignments, writing and presenting a final report
Assessment: active participation in class and final report. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: chapters and articles from related literature
Target group: Second and third year students

 

EKIA512 TOWARDS MODERN ENGLISH, 4 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • describe the socio-historical background in the English-speaking countries before its expansion into a world language

  • see the connections between broad historical trends and the changes in language

  • observe independently the historical states of different varieties of the English language through a number of electronic databases (e.g. The Oxford English Dictionary and different corpora of British and American English).

Prerequisites: EKIP504 The Story of English.
Methods of study: Lectures, group discussions, weekly homework assignments.
Assessment: Grading on the scale from 0 to 5, based on active participation and a final report.
Reading: A course booklet + additional reading in Optima.
Target group: Second or third year students.

 

EKIA516 MEDIA IN BRITAIN, 4 pts

Learning outcomes: The main aim of this course is to familiarize oneself with the media scene in Britain. After completing the course the students will be able to

  • discuss recent history and development of the media in Britain
  • reflect on and explain the relationship between politics and media in Britain
  • discuss the issues of nationality and media in Britain

Prerequisites: Basic studies
Methods of study: Readings, pair/group work, writing and presenting a final report.
Assessment: Active participation in class and final report. Grading: 0-5.
Reading: t.b.a.
Target group: 2nd or 3rd year students.

 

EKIA517 KEY ISSUES IN SOCIOLINGUISTICS, 4 pts

Learning Outcomes: This is an introductory course targeted at any English student interested in sociolinguistics, or the relationship between language and society. While macro-sociolinguistics, broadly speaking, deals with the connections between language and society at large (e.g. language policy, societal multilingualism, language shift and maintenance), the focus of this course will be on micro-sociolinguistics: linguistic variation and diversity based on individual language users and relatively small communities of practice.

After completing the course the students will be able to

  • name and explain key issues and terms in micro-sociolinguistics (including regional, social and stylistic variation, individual bi/multilingualism, and language norms and attitudes)
  • describe major strands of research in micro-sociolinguistics
  • have an idea of  the types of  usable data and ways of conducting research on language variation
  • relate to these from the perspective of English, its users and learners in Finland and elsewhere 

Prerequisites: EKIP504 The Story of English
Methods of Study: Weekly readings and tasks, pair and group work, co-teaching, lectures
Assessment: Active participation in and out-of-class, co-teaching, course paper/project, reflection and self-evaluation; evaluation on the scale 0 – 5
Reading: A set of selected readings/textbook – to be decided on later
Target Group: 2nd and 3rd year students

 
EKIA518 PERSPECTIVES ON LANGUAGE AND CULTURE, 4 pts

This course studies how language is embedded in social and cultural activities. The focus is on learning how to combine detailed analysis of language use with fieldwork and close observation of participants’ activities and interactions. We examine the relationship between language and culture through analyzing how words, grammatical structures and discourse patterns express identities, relationships and cultural meanings in different contexts.  Key concepts and methods are drawn from linguistic anthropology and ethnography. During classes students apply these tools to data collected from a variety of settings including everyday talk, interaction in public places, online interactions and selected work activities. 

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • understand and discuss key concepts in ethnography and linguistic anthropology
  • use ethnographic methods to collect data 
  • analyse the relationship between language and culture

Prerequisites: Discourse and Literacy. Working with Discourse highly recommended.
Methods of study: Readings, group work tasks, hands-on-analysis tasks, field project.
Assessment: Small-scale research project based on field work. Written report. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Selected readings will be provided.
Target group: Second and third year students.

EKIA603 BA THESIS SEMINAR, 3 pts

Learning outcomes: Writing a BA Thesis on language learning and teaching, discourse studies, or language and culture. After completing the course students will be able to

  • explain principles of scientific thinking and working methods

  • search for information and source literature

  • plan and carry out the different stages of a research project according to deadlines

  • report on the progress of their research in both spoken and written form:

    • writing a research plan and various thesis drafts

    • giving an oral presentation

    • reflecting and discussing in class

  • critically evaluate and support other students' work.

Prerequisites: Basic Studies and some Subject Studies.
Methods of study: Active and regular participation, exercises, giving feedback to others, meetings with the supervisor, and writing a 15- page thesis individually or with a pair. After the thesis is finished, the students take a maturity test (1 op) in their mother tongue on a specially set exam date or as an e-exam (eTentti). The maturity test is a part of the compulsory language and communication studies.
Assessment: Active participation, respecting the deadlines, ability to carry out independent work. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: Third or fourth year students.

Judit Háhn (two groups)
This seminar is meant for students who would like to do research in the fields of sociolinguistics, internet linguistics, text linguistics, genre analysis and discourse studies. I also welcome those who are interested in second/foreign language learning and teaching.
I offer two groups, one starting in September and one starting in January. The group starting in January will carry on till the end of the following autumn term. This is thus an option for those students who are planning on going abroad either for this autumn term or in the spring term after the proseminar ends in December. For the latter group I invite applications also from second-year students who feel that they are ready for a pro seminar (most subject studies courses done).

Tuula Hirvonen
My pro seminar group concentrates on topics in applied linguistics, particularly those related to second language acquisition, foreign language teaching and teaching of writing. I would like to continue in the area of writing with those who are interested in exploring instruction in academic writing, use of feedback and tutoring writing. Other topics are accepted as well.

Helena Höylä
I welcome students who are interested in issues related to language learning and teaching, especially in the role of cognition in language learning and knowledge, but also other topics such as language tasks and assessment.

EKIA607 BA THESIS, 7 pts

Learning outcomes: After writing a BA Thesis students will be able to

  • name research orientations and apply the basic concepts in language study appropriately

  • carry out a small-scale research project under supervision

    • narrow down the topic and search for relevant research literature

    • formulate a research question

    • gather data and analyse it using appropriate methods

    • write up a coherent research report.

Prerequisites: Basic Studies and some Subject Studies. The introductory course on the chosen line of expertise (EKIA301 or EKIA415).
Methods of study: Independent work, group work, individual supervision.
Assessment: BA Thesis, carrying out a research process. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: Third or fourth year students.

 

 

 

ADVANCED STUDIES


EKIS108 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION FOR TEACHERS, TUTORING WRITING, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • apply their knowledge of writing process to tutoring novice writers

  • have a better understanding of teaching writing

  • understand the processes involved in giving feedback and

  • give appropriate feedback.

The course aims to instruct and give hands-on experience to advanced level students in teaching and tutoring beginning writers in English. If you have taken Academic Writing or equivalent, you have the required background for the course. You will work in pairs tutoring your own Academic Writing students, Language Centre students on campus or learners off-campus to learn about feedback as a process and about yourself as a feedback giver. Pair work will give you a chance to exchange experiences about tutoring and feedback. Tutoring will consist of consultation and feedback to writers on the early drafts of assignments and reading final drafts. The course offers experience that is directly relevant to teachers in classrooms and adult education.

Prerequisites: EKIP102 Academic Writing or equivalent completed in Basic Studies; preferably you have also completed the BA Thesis Seminar; a minimum of one year must have elapsed from doing EKIP102 Academic Writing.
Methods of study: Groups meetings with the instructor and tutoring students.
Assessment: Course paper based on the work with the tutees and reading background literature. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: Recommended for future teachers. The course complements teaching practice and can be fitted into the schedule during the year when you are attending teacher training. Advanced level students only (those who have completed Subject Studies).

 

EKIS108 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION, GENRES IN WRITING, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: In this course, students will overview, analyse and practice a range of text types in English, as well as specialising in a particular text type of their choice. After completing the course, students will be able to:

  • recognise the structural and linguistic features of different text types in English

  • understand the social origins and purposes of written language norms within various genres and contexts

  • produce a range of text types (e.g. commercial, journalistic, technical, academic, creative, online) following or manipulating genre norms

  • apply the analytical tools acquired on the course to any new text types and contexts encountered in working life.

Prerequisites: EKIP404 Discourse and Literacy.
Methods of study: Lectures, pair presentations, and group work.
Assessment: Based on pair presentations and several short written assignments. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: A useful background source is Hyland, K. (2004). Genre and Second Language Writing.
Target group: Students who wish to learn structure and language expectations for a range of different text types and contexts in English. Future teachers are also welcome, as the course offers students practice in teaching writing skills and giving feedback.

 

EKIS108 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION, 5 pts

Learning Outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • identify the main criteria for writing effectively in the types of writing covered

  • apply those criteria in their own writing.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study:

  • the study of a variety of sample texts from among the following different types of writing : the English essay (i.e. personal writing on virtually any topic) , creative writing, literary criticism, opinion and argument, reporting, instruction

  • the writing of similar types of texts

  • critical discussion of the writing produced by students

  • redrafting and further discussion leading to a final draft.

Assessment: By outcome from the process described above and particularly the final drafts. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: The examples of texts of the different types are posted in Optima.
Target group: Anyone wanting to develop in a variety of types of writing.

 

EKIS150 ENGLISH FOR PROFESSIONAL LIFE, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: At the end of the course students are expected to be able to

  • write different types of letters for professional life, including letters of application

  • have developed as conversationalists, particularly in ‘small talk’ and in job interviews

  • make an effective presentation in English.

  • understand cross-cultural issues particularly as they apply to oral communication and particularly to presentations and negotiations.

  • have an improved grasp of methods of negotiating.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Presentation by the course tutor, discussion, a variety of written tasks, and student presentations. Course work will be posted in Optima.
Assessment: Continuous ‘by outcome’ based on the various tasks. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Students will be required to obtain a copy of Roger Noël Smith, Effective Presentations in English from the University Copy Shop. If you are interested in cross culture, three books by Richard D. Lewis are highly recommended: in particular his Cross Cultural Communication, A Visual Approach, Transcreen Publications (1990) ISBN 0 9534398 0 2; When Cultures Collide, Nicholas Brealey International (3rd ed., 2006); and Finland, Cultural Lone Wolf.
Target group: Advanced level students.

  

EKIS212 LEXICAL RESEARCH IN ACTION, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: The course introduces students to the practical aspects of lexical research, with an examination into the viability and the general status of words in the lexicon as observed in dictionaries and electronic collections of texts. After completing the course students will be able to

  • approach questions on lexical viability empirically

  • recognize the common practical limitations and problems faced in dictionary-making, and in the analysis of corpus evidence

  • make assessments on the lexicographical issues on the status of words.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Group meetings every second week, background reading, individual research, written report presenting the findings.
Assessment: Regular attendance in group meetings, individual work, and written report. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Will be provided during the course.
Target group: Advanced level students interested in developing research ideas for their MA theses, and students curious about the practical aspects of conducting studies on the English vocabulary.

 

EKIS210 NEW WORDS IN ENGLISH, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • use the basic concepts and terminology in describing issues of morphology essential to an understanding of word-formation

  • describe and examine the processes used in creating new words in English, and observe the popularity of the processes in different genres

  • critically discuss the empirical methods in the characterisation of productivity and neologisms in general.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Theory sessions, homework assignments, and a final examination.
Assessment: Regular attendance, class participation, and the final exam; Scale 0–5.
Reading: Texts and questions provided each week.
Target group: Advanced level students.


EKIS274 THE STUDY OF TEXT, 5 pts

Texts can be seen as products, structures and processes. Etymologically, the term text originates from the Latin verb texere, meaning “to weave, to join, to construct.” The question is how the elements of language are woven together to produce a communicative system. This course gives an overview of the main trends in the study, analysis and categorization of texts. The course will integrate approaches both from text linguistics and genre theory. 

Learning outcomes: After completing the course the students will be able to

  • identify the main directions of research in text linguistics,
  • understand and apply the concepts of text, texture, text type and genre,
  • differentiate between structural, functional and cognitive approaches,
  • categorize texts in terms of text types and genres,
  • describe the move structure of various texts.

Prerequisites: None. 
Method of study: lectures, class discussion, analysis tasks
Assessment: written assignments and a final exam. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: chapters and articles from related literature
Target group: Advanced level students 

 

EKIS303 TEACHING AND LEARNING VOCABULARY, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • assess vocabulary studies from the point of view of teaching and learning English as a second/foreign language

  • explain and discuss different trends, strategies and methods of learning and teaching vocabulary

  • carry out a basic analysis of learner texts from the point of view of vocabulary

  • apply a chosen teaching method in teaching vocabulary in practice.

Prerequisites: Basic Studies and EKIA301 Language learning and teaching. EKIA303 What is a word does no harm but is not compulsory.
Methods of study: Readings, pair/group work, analysing learner texts, designing and carrying out a teaching experiment in pairs or in small groups.
Assessment: Active participation in class, teaching experiment and final paper. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Material available in Optima.
Target group: Advanced level students.

 

EKIS376 OPTIONS IN TEACHING EFL GRAMMAR, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: This is a theoretically informed but hands-on course for future teachers of English addressing issues related to teaching grammar within the Finnish school system. After completing the course students will be able to

  • provide a number of definitions of key terms

  • explain why grammar should be taught (or not)

  • describe principles on which grammar teaching can be based

  • evaluate (critically) grammar lessons in existing series of EFL textbooks

  • design grammar lessons from a variety of theoretical starting points.

Prerequisites: KLSA124 Johdatus kielen oppimisen ja opettamisen tutkimukseen and EKIA301 Language Learning and Teaching.
Methods of study: Readings and tasks, pair and group work, co-teaching; lectures.
Assessment: Active participation in and out-of-class, co-teaching, course paper and self-evaluation. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: A selected set of readings.
Target group: From third to fifth year students.

 

EKIS407 LANGUAGE AND SOCIAL MEDIA, 5 pts

A key goal of this course is to shed light on social media as increasingly important and meaningful sites for language use, social action and cultural production in everyday, professional and institutional contexts. For future language experts and language teachers, it is increasingly important to understand the role social media have, their key characteristics and the potential in professional communication. The course will shed light on how activities in social media are increasingly characterized by diversity and translocality. Drawing on sociolinguistics of globalization, ethnography and discourse studies, it will offer a theoretical and methodological grounding for the analysis of different types of social media discourse.

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • identify and understand key approaches to, concepts and methods of the study of language and social media, including sociolinguistics of globalization, discourse analysis of social media, online ethnography and multi-modality.

  • describe social media activities from the perspectives of language choice and use, and linguistic and discursive heterogeneity

  • analyse the indexicality of language use and discourse patterns: the ways in which they serve as social and cultural resources, how they draw on and contribute to norms and ideologies of language, communication and meaning making.

  • to plan and build up a small scale research report, and to report on it both orally and in writing.

Prerequisites: EKIP203 Introduction to Language Study and EKIA415 Working with Discourse(Sociolinguistics).
Methods of study: Lectures, readings, project work, course conference.
Assessment: Participation in class, a small-scale research project reported orally and in writing. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: This is an advanced course suitable for language experts and future EFL teachers.

 

EKIS409 CINEMATIC NARRATIVES OF IDENTITY, DIFFERENCE AND DIVERSITY, 5 pts

This course is suitable for students who are interested in narratives, how they are constructed and structured, and how, in the late modern globalized world, they are centrally concerned with questions of identity, difference and diversity. For language experts and language teachers alike, it is important to understand how cinematic narratives are an influential discourse mediating particular representations of identities, differences and diversities which can influence a great deal the ways we see and deal with ourselves and The Other.

A specific focus in the course is multilingual film, including such genres as migrant and diasporic film, Hollywood cinema and science fiction. Drawing on sociolinguistics, narrative and film theory, as well as discourse studies, these cinematic products will be investigated from the perspective on how their mixed and heterogeneous language uses and dialogue serve as means for building up multi-dimensional narratives of identity, difference and diversity.

Learning outcomes: By the end of the course, students will

  • be familiar with and able to apply concepts and methods of sociolinguistics of globalization, narrative theory, film theory and discourse analysis to the analysis of multilingual film narratives.

  • be able to plan and conduct a small-scale research project on how identity, difference and/or diversity is represented linguistically, discursively and cinematically in cinematic narratives.

  • be able to report both orally and in writing the results of their project work.

Prerequisites: EKIP203 Introduction to Language Study and EKIA415 Working with Discourse (Sociolinguistics).
Methods of study: Lectures, readings (in Optima), project work in a small group, course conference.
Assessment: Participation in class, a small-scale research project reported orally and in writing. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: This is an advanced course suitable for language experts and future EFL teachers.

 

EKIS451 SHAKESPEARE, 5 pts

In this course one tragedy and one comedy by Shakespeare are studied.

Learning Outcomes: After completing the course the students are expected to

  • be familiar with themes in these two plays including thematic connections between them, and how they are developed and presented dramatically

  • be able to identify a rich variety of aspects of Shakespeare’s use of language and how it contributes to the dramatic appeal of the plays

  • be able to discuss how Shakespeare’s scenes are constructed, and the consequent dramatic impact

  • be familiar with the meaning of the terms Shakespearean tragedy, comedy and romance particularly as they apply to these two plays and

  • understand how Shakespeare’s handling of tragedy, comedy and romance affects audience response.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of Study: The plays will be read Act by Act, in a spirit of shared discovery. Students will be allocated Acts in groups and asked to prepare them for presentation to the rest of the class and in ways that stimulate discussion.
Assessment: Examination. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Shakespeare, Othello and The Winter’s Tale. An annotated edition is needed for its help in understanding Shakespeare’s language, whether Arden or Cambridge or Penguin etc. Some extracts from critics including Emrys Jones’ Scenic Form in Shakespeare (Oxford 1971, now out of print but available on the Internet) and from Frank Kermode’s Shakespeare’s Language (Penguin 2000) will be made available in Optima. Neither book is formally required but Kermode’s book is highly recommended.
Target Group: Third year students onwards. Anyone interested in exploring the dramatic art of William Shakespeare.

 

EKIS460 BRITISH AND IRISH LITERATURE, 5 pts

The title of the course refers to literature in English by authors born in Britain and Ireland.

The course theme is the individual’s attempt to find some basis for living a moral life in a world in which there is no longer a generally accepted system of belief or code of values. In other words it examines the responses of writers to problems posed by modernity.

Learning outcomes: At the end of the course students will be expected to be able to

  • analyse the course theme in a broad selection of literature of the 19th and 20th centuries

  • analyse how the ideas are expressed through a variety of genres and periods

  • relate the ideas to society and the thought and belief current at different times.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of study: Weekly pre-prepared texts are discussed in small groups prior to whole group discussion.
Reading: A manageable weekly selection (usually from one author per week) of mainly prose fiction from the 19th and 20th Centuries, including short stories and extracts from novels.  If there are any students may wish to make their own selection/s of literature for study, opportunities to do so will be provided.  No books need to be purchased for this course as all of the material will be posted in Optima or will be readily available on the Internet.
Assessment: Assignment of about 1200 words. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: Any student at this level. This course is an opportunity to develop literary interests after Literary Texts or Classics Reading Circle but attendance at either of those is not a requirement.

 

EKIS458 THE AMERICAN SHORT STORY, 5 pts

Learning Outcomes: After completing the course students will have read a variety of American short stories from different periods, and be able to discuss and write about

  • their themes and how they may be regarded as American, including

  • how the stories reflect concerns and changes in American society;

  • the characteristics of American short stories of different periods including

  • the development of form of the American short story.

Prerequisites: None.
Methods of Study: Weekly tasks mainly on (typically) one short story are posted in Optima to be prepared before class where they will be discussed in groups before whole group discussion.
Assessment: Written assignment of approximately 1400 words. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: The texts are either posted in Optima or readily available on the Internet. The anthology by Nagel, The American Short Story (Houghton Mifflin, 2002) is very highly recommended (though not obligatory) and all of the stories we will be considering are contained in it.
Target Group: Students at Advanced studies level. It is not necessary to have attended the American Novels course, but those who have done so would find this course a logical extension of their interest in American literature and a rich source of a potential topic for thesis work on literature.


EKIS511 LANGUAGE CHANGE AND USE IN THE INFORMATION SOCIETY, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course the students will be able to

  • describe how the appearance of new media and technology triggered social and cultural changes,
  • understand and explain how these changes influenced language use and interaction,
  • understand and apply the terms CMC, DMC, EMC, IBC and VMC,
  • describe the scope of internet linguistics,
  • characterize various digital genres and discourses from a linguistic perspective.

Prerequisites: None. 
Method of study: lectures, class discussion, written assignments
Assessment: active participation in class and final report. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: chapters and articles from related literature
Target group: Advanced level students

 

EKIS574 LANGUAGE AS CULTURAL PRACTICE, 5 pts

This course explores the relationship between language and cultural practices. The role of language in people’s lives cannot be understood without the study of the ways in which words, grammatical structures and discourse patterns are embedded in social and cultural activities such as greeting, giving directions, telling stories, agreeing and disagreeing, playing, arguing, performing, learning or engaging in political debates. This course introduces theoretical perspectives, methods and analytic tools for studying how such activities are accomplished and organized in different cultural settings. We will work with data and topics drawn from research projects in the department as well as materials chosen by the participants to explore how utterances and their meanings are shaped by the social and cultural fabric in which they are embedded.

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to

  • identify and critically discuss key approaches to the study of language and culture, including linguistic anthropology, language socialization and ethnography

  • describe cultural activities at the level of linguistic and other semiotic resources, structures of discourse/interaction and overall organizational patterns

  • analyse the relationship between language, social and cultural practices, identities, norms and ideologies using the tools and methods applied on the course.

Prerequisites: EKIA415 Working with Discourse or EKIA301 Language Learning and Teaching
Methods of study: Readings, group assignments, class discussion, hands-on analysis tasks, field project.
Assessment: Pair/group assignments, small-scale research project, course paper. Grading: 0 to 5.
Reading: Reading list provided in course syllabus.
Target group: All students at advanced level.

 

EKIS577 AMERICAN SOCIETY THROUGH DRAMA: MILLER’S AMERICA, 5 pts

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to:

  • talk more authoritatively about aspects of America’s history and development until the present

  • understand and discuss contemporary American society better

  • appreciate the work of one of America’s leading 20th century playwrights.

PrerequisitesEKIP505 History of the English-speaking World and EKIA411 American Novels would be desirable.
Methods of study: Reading and discussion, the discussions sometimes led by the instructor and sometimes by the students.
Assessment: Class participation and final essay. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Reading: Plays and other writing by Arthur Miller. The works will include Death of a Salesman, The Crucible, A View from the Bridge, All My Sons, and The American Clock; the screenplay of The Misfits; the short stories Fitter's Night and Fame; and some essays. 
Target group: Advanced level students with an interest in American drama, history, and social and cultural issues.

 


EKIS605
MA THESIS SEMINAR, 5 pts

The MA Thesis Seminar is compulsory for all English majors. Those English minors who intend to write a MA Thesis on the English language can either take the Seminar or an additional Advanced course (5 pts) in their line of specialization. The purpose of the Seminar is to help students in planning, carrying out and eventually completing the Thesis (e.g. in narrowing down a manageable research topic, choosing appropriate methods of data collection and analysis), and in writing up the report. Students have to attend the Seminar for a minimum of one term but basically as long as it seems feasible for the Thesis to be completed by a date agreed by the supervisor and the student.

Learning outcomes: After completing the course students will be able to carry out a research project from its initial stage to its completion in accordance with an agreed plan. More specifically, they will be able to

  • plan a research project and carry it out stage by stage

  • discuss (in class) research conducted in the field

  • give constructive feedback on work-in-progress

  • report orally on their own work-in-progress (research questions, data collection and analysis, and findings)

  • write up a grammatically correct and fluent research report.

Prerequisites: EKIA603 BA Thesis Seminar and KLSA012 Tutkimuksen teon perusteet. Before taking the MA Thesis Seminar, students are expected to have completed all Subject Studies and most of Advanced Studies.
Methods of study: Meetings every two weeks, group or pair work, independent study, private consultation.
Assessment: Assessment will be based on active participation in group discussion, oral presentations at different stages of the project and peer feedback on other students' work in progress, including a poster session. Students are required to submit a research plan with an initial and final version, give peer feedback in writing and submit 3-4 chapters of the Thesis (approximately 35-40 pages) for final assessment. Grading on the scale from 0 to 5.
Target group: Fourth or fifth year students.

Anne Pitkänen-Huhta
This seminar is for students who are interested in second/foreign language learning in formal and informal settings, literacy practices in and out of school, and issues related to multilingualism in education. It is also possible to design theoretically driven sets of teaching materials for specific groups of learners.

Katja Mäntylä
This MA thesis seminar is meant especially for students who are interested in applied linguistics, in particular second/foreign language learning and teaching, language assessment, and/or vocabulary studies. I also invite students who wish to create a teaching material package as their thesis.

Sirpa Leppänen & Samu Kytölä
This seminar is for those students who are interested in sociolinguistics and discourse studies.  Their thesis work can relate to (i) sociolinguistic analysis of language diversity, (ii) discourse analysis of written media texts, (ii) language and gender and (iii) stylistic, literary and narrative analysis of fiction and film. Particularly welcome are students who are interested in investigating social media as sites for language use, social action and cultural production (for more information, see http://www.socialmediadiscourses.fi/).

Arja Piirainen-Marsh & Leila Kääntä
This seminar group is mainly for students who are interested in the study of language use, or language in action, in different social settings. Relevant fields of study include pragmatics, discourse analysis, sociolinguistics and conversation analysis. Students interested in discourse and interaction in everyday, professional or institutional (e.g. media, classroom) settings, English as an international or second language or bilingualism/multilingualism are welcome.

 

EKIS620 MA THESIS (minors), 20 pts (see below, but Assessment: on a scale from fail to pass)

 

EKIS640 MA THESIS, 40 pts

The MA Thesis is a research report conducted with the help scientific methods. Planning and conducting a research project and writing it up as the MA Thesis provides students practice in a number of research skills. These skills are crucial also in the work of both language teachers and language experts, including the ability to plan and conduct work-related projects, project management, critical reading and writing and presentation skills. In addition, the MA Thesis Seminar gives students an opportunity to gain more experience in working in teams and receiving and giving feedback.

Learning outcomes: After completing a MA Thesis students will be able to

  • carry out a major research project under supervision (including planning, execution, reporting and evaluation), or more specifically:

  • draft a research plan/proposal

  • narrow down the topic to be researched

  • search for relevant research literature to establish a theoretical framework for the study and evaluate critically past research

  • formulate a set of research questions (or hypotheses)

  • collect data and analyze these using appropriate methods

  • write up a coherent and cohesive research report (and report orally on aspects of the process and/or outcome).

Prerequisites: Subject studies and most Advanced Studies completed.
Methods of Study: Independent work, individual supervision.
Assessment: MA Thesis. Grading on the scale from 1 to 5.
Target Group: Fourth or fifth year students.

 

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