Professor Shawn Loewen gives two talks and one workshop during his visit in June

Professor Shawn Loewen is an expert in Instructed Second Language Acquisition, particularly in relation to classroom interaction. He will give two talks and one workshop during his visit. In addition, he is available for individual or group consultation. See more details about the talks below and mark them in your calendars! More information about Shawn on his webpage http://sls.msu.edu/people/core-faculty/shawn-loewen/
  • Professor Shawn Loewen gives two talks and one workshop during his visit in June
  • 2019-06-11T14:00:00+03:00
  • 2019-06-13T04:00:00+03:00
  • Professor Shawn Loewen is an expert in Instructed Second Language Acquisition, particularly in relation to classroom interaction. He will give two talks and one workshop during his visit. In addition, he is available for individual or group consultation. See more details about the talks below and mark them in your calendars! More information about Shawn on his webpage http://sls.msu.edu/people/core-faculty/shawn-loewen/
  • When Jun 11, 2019 02:00 PM to Jun 13, 2019 04:00 AM (Europe/Helsinki / UTC300)
  • Where Lyhty, F205, Agora D214.1
  • Contact Name
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A joint event with Matthew Poehner: Shawn Loewen's talk: Exploring the research-pedagogy link in second language teaching; Matthew Poehner's talk: Praxis in L2 Education: Conceptual and Methodological Considerations, Tue 11.6. at 14-16 at Lyhty

Shawn's abstract:

The relationship between instructed second language acquisition (ISLA) research and second language (L2) pedagogy can be contentious. On the one hand, teachers may resent ivory tower researchers who do not address issues that teachers feel are relevant to real classroom instruction. On the other hand, researchers may feel frustrated that teachers do not pay attention to research findings that could facilitate L2 learning. However, rather than adopting adversarial positions, many researchers, myself included, call for a good-faith dialogue between researchers and teachers in order to facilitate research that is relevant for teachers and that produces evidence-based implications for the classroom. To create and facilitate the dialogue, it is equally important that researchers and teachers together create a community where teachers can critically evaluate evidence-based suggestions by researchers. With such a dialogue in place, we can ensure that both ISLA research and L2 instruction will be at its best. The current talk will explore some of the evidence-based practices that research suggests may be beneficial for the classroom, while considering teachers perspectives on these findings.

 

Mobile-assisted Language Learning, Wed 12.6. at 10-12 at F205

Mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) continues to increase, with a proliferation of platforms such as Duolingo, Babbel, and Rosetta Stone. Instructed second language acquisition researchers have begun to take notice of this phenomenon; however, only a few studies have investigated the second language (L2) learning that takes place when students use these programs. The current presentation presents two recent research projects that investigated the perceptions and learning gains of students using MALL apps to study an L2 for one semester. The first study involved nine ab initio learners who used Duolingo to study Turkish. The second study included 54 university students of low to intermediate proficiency who studied Spanish using Babbel. The presentation will consider the affective and motivational aspects of MALL by examining participants’ journal and interview data. In addition, pretest (Spanish only) and posttest (Turkish and Spanish) data provide information about how effective learners were when using these apps for L2 learning. Implications for the development and use of mobile apps will be considered.  

 

Interaction Workshop, Thu 13.6. at 12-16 at Ag D214.1

Second language (L2) interaction, both inside and outside of the classroom, has been a topic of interest in multiple theoretical traditions within the field of applied linguistics and second language acquisition. The current workshop presents a cognitive interactionist approach to L2 interaction, and will examine key constructs, such as negotiation for meaning, negotiation of form, corrective feedback (including recasts and prompts), language-related episodes, and uptake. Definitions and operationalizations of these constructs will be discussed, along with examples from L2 classroom interaction. During the workshop, participants will have the opportunity to examine classroom discourse with the goal of considering how a cognitive interactionist approach would account for the interaction. Similarities and differences between the cognitive interactionist approach and other theoretical perspectives will also be discussed.