23.10.2017

Instructions on keeping a lab book / SMB

1 The Lab book:  students will be given a booklet (preferably hard cover) with a size of A4.

2 The Pen: use ink only. Get a pen that is not washed out by water or e.g. methanol. Your lab book must be readable after 10 years. Never erase anything you have written. If you make a mistake, strike it out with pen.

3 Write your name on the book.

4 Number with pen every page of the book (if they are not numbered to start with).

5 Leave the 3 first pages empty for table of contents. You fill these out during progress of your work.

6 The basic idea is to produce a reliable and detailed record of what you have done, so anyone who picks up your lab book can repeat your experiments. Your lab book is property of the laboratory you are working in. You must not take it with you when you leave the lab (this may not be so for courses).

7 Write down date, number of exercise and instructor’s name. Write down what will be done in the experiment and why you doing this experiment.

8 Methods and materials: write down reagent’s name, manufacturer, product number, lot number, of pre-made reagents write down contents who made them and date of preparation. Write down used software, instruments, settings, calibration methods etc. Regarding centrifuges write down rotor type, speed and time used. Write down also all calculations (also the equation used). If you should use loose pieces of paper for records (strongly advised against), attach them all to your book. Write down everything that you do in such a way that anyone who picks up your lab book can repeat your experiments.

9 Results: write down instrument readings. If they are provided as print, make sure to glue the print on your page. Glue on page gels (or photos of them). Include printed or drawn spectra and other images. Include copies of microscopy pictures. If you store original data on computers, write down machine locations, filenames and paths so you can retrieve them later if needed. Write down also all calculations (also the equation used). Comment on results and mention both successes and failures.

10 Discussion: add your comments, interpretations of results, and additional questions there may be now that the experiment is completed. Speculate on why the experiment worked or didn’t. Remember to refer to all results within the experiment and compare your results with other’s work.

11 Mark used references at the place where they are used.

 

11.1 The Lab book:  students will be given a booklet (preferably hard cover) with a size of A4.

11.2 The Pen: use ink only. Get a pen that is not washed out by water or e.g. methanol. Your lab book must be readable after 10 years. Never erase anything you have written. If you make a mistake, strike it out with pen.

11.3 Write your name on the book.

11.4 Number with pen every page of the book (if they are not numbered to start with).

11.5 Leave the 3 first pages empty for table of contents. You fill these out during progress of your work.

11.6 The basic idea is to produce a reliable and detailed record of what you have done, so anyone who picks up your lab book can repeat your experiments. Your lab book is property of the laboratory you are working in. You must not take it with you when you leave the lab (this may not be so for courses).

11.7 Write down date, number of exercise and instructor’s name. Write down what will be done in the experiment and why you doing this experiment.

11.8 Methods and materials: write down reagent’s name, manufacturer, product number, lot number, of pre-made reagents write down contents who made them and date of preparation. Write down used software, instruments, settings, calibration methods etc. Regarding centrifuges write down rotor type, speed and time used. Write down also all calculations (also the equation used). If you should use loose pieces of paper for records (strongly advised against), attach them all to your book. Write down everything that you do in such a way that anyone who picks up your lab book can repeat your experiments.

11.9 Results: write down instrument readings. If they are provided as print, make sure to glue the print on your page. Glue on page gels (or photos of them). Include printed or drawn spectra and other images. Include copies of microscopy pictures. If you store original data on computers, write down machine locations, filenames and paths so you can retrieve them later if needed. Write down also all calculations (also the equation used). Comment on results and mention both successes and failures.

11.10 Discussion: add your comments, interpretations of results, and additional questions there may be now that the experiment is completed. Speculate on why the experiment worked or didn’t. Remember to refer to all results within the experiment and compare your results with other’s work.

11.11 Mark used references at the place where they are used.