08.10.2018

Arterial stiffness, hemodynamic and force production responses to different concurrent exercise models

Lee, E.1, Laukkanen, J. A.2,3, Häkkinen, K.1 1Neuromuscular Research Center, Biology of Physical Activity, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland; 2Health Sciences, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland; 3Central Finland Hospital District, Department of Internal Medicine, Jyväskylä, Finland

Introduction: Arterial stiffness, a reliable predictor of cardiovascular mortality, seems to respond differently to strength, and endurance exercise. However, the effects of different concurrent exercise structures on arterial stiffness have not been fully studied. The purpose of the study was to determine the vascular, hemodynamic and force production responses to different concurrent exercise models.

Methods: Eight (33.5±5.9 years) recreationally trained males took part in three loading sessions; strength followed by endurance (SE), endurance followed by strength (ES), and an integrated model (INT), where endurance and strength components alternated within the session. Participants performed all loadings in a randomized order. S consisted of countermovement jumps, drop jumps, 5-step bounding and dynamic leg press (3x10reps at 80% of 1RM). E was a 45-minute run on the treadmill at the velocity of 80-85% of VO2max and for INT the endurance component was divided into 9x5-minute runs at the same intensity (80-85%) in-between the strength sets. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and hemodynamic values were measured pre, post and 30 minutes after. Maximal isometric force in the bilateral leg press was measured pre and post.

Results: Compared to pre-exercise values, there were significant decreases in mean PWV (7.9 ± 0.7 m/s vs 7.3 ± 0.8 m/s, respectively) (p = 0.017) post-exercise. Mean diastolic blood pressure had a statistically significant interaction effect between time and loading (F(4, 28) = 3.677, p = 0.016). Significant changes in maximal force was detected in the SE (3248 ± 860 vs 2754 ± 852 N) (p = 0.017) and ES (3340 ± 1089 vs 2858 ± 714 N) (p = 0.025) models only.

Conclusions: An order effect may exist between SE and ES based on PWV and DBP.  Nevertheless, concurrent exercise did not lead to detrimental effects in PWV with ES loading eliciting the greatest positive response. Interestingly, maximal force was not significantly reduced in the INT loading.